Discoveries

Chemists make first Re-Zn-Zn-Re molecule

January 16, 2019

Re-Zn-Zn-Re moleculeZinc-zinc bonds are rare in chemistry. So are linear four-metal compounds. Nevertheless, Trevor D. Lohrey, a member of John Arnold’s group at the University of California, Berkeley, has made the first molecule with a Re-Zn-Zn-Re core. Lohrey used a rhenium(I) salt to reduce ZnCl2 and make a zinc cation to which anionic rhenium compounds coordinated.

Drug sponge could minimize side effects of cancer treatment

January 9, 2019

scientists discover new drug spongeWith the help of sponges inserted in the bloodstream to absorb excess drugs, doctors and scientists are hoping to prevent the dangerous side effects of toxic chemotherapy agents or even deliver higher doses to knock back tumors, like liver cancer, that don’t respond to more benign treatments.

Cracking the code to soot formation

September 7, 2018

industrial sootThe longstanding mystery of soot formation, which combustion scientists have been trying to explain for decades, appears to be finally solved, thanks to research led by scientists at Sandia National Laboratories. This groundbreaking work was published in 'Science' magazine with involvement from scientists at UC Berkeley and Lawrence Berkeley Lab.

Actinide acts as electron donor for first time

May 3, 2018

A new thorium-aluminum complex discovered A new thorium-aluminum complex is the first in which an actinide element donates electrons when bonding with a metal.

Turning chemical bonds inside out

July 23, 2018


Richmond Sarpong research teamImagine a future where chemists could restructure the morphine molecule to have the opiate pain management value but not the addictive side effect. That is one possible outcome of an exciting new process being reported in Science magazine from the chemistry lab of Richmond Sarpong at UC Berkeley.

The never-ending race to concoct the bluest blue

September 7, 2018

quantum blue pigmentIn an underground lab in California, scientists have created a new hue called Quantum Blue. Fifth-year Ph.D. chemistry students Arunima Balan and Joseph Swabeck are on the trail to the blueset blue. Paul Alivisatos, Samsung distinguished professor of nanoscience and nanotechnology opened up his lab and assigned Balan and Swabeck to work on the fascinating problem of creating the new pigment color using quantum dot technology with artist Olga Alexopoulou.

Genome-editing revolution: My whirlwind year with CRISPR

December 22, 2015

Jennifer DoudnaJennifer Doudna, a pioneer of the revolutionary genome-editing technology, reflects on how 2015 became the most intense year of her career — and what she's learned.

Read the article.

UC vows to protect groundbreaking CRISPR invention despite court decision

September 11, 2018

DNA photo - Getty Images

A statement about the U.S. Court of Appeals decision on the University of California's patent interference claim before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board b by Charles F. Robinson, Office of General Counsel, UC Office of the President.

Semisynthetic artemisinin anti-malarials reach African children

August 15, 2014

Jay Keasling with children in a village outside Nairobi, Kenya. (Photo by Gabrielle Tenenbaumn)1.7 million treatments of semisynthetic artemisinin have shipped to Africa, where they will treat malaria sufferers in Burkina Faso, Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Niger and Nigeria over the next few months. This shipment is the culmination of a 13-year project in the lab of CBE professor Jay Keasling. Enough semisynthetic artemisinin has been produced for 70 million treatments, and the capacity exists to produce 100-150 million treatments annually.