Biochemistry

Copper regulates sleep in zebrafish

June 9, 2018

New research on copper could lead to better understanding of role in sleep.New research on copper could lead to better understanding of role in sleep.

Sewage sludge leads to biofuels breakthrough

March 26, 2018

Jewel Lake, Tilden Park Berkeley. Photo ChickMarkley.JBEI enzyme discovery enables first-time microbial production of an aromatic biofuel.

Brewing hoppy beer without the hops

March 20, 2018

The first women chemists at Cal

February 5, 2018

Early Women Chemistry Scientists at Cal The College salutes the pioneer women chemistry faculty at Cal. Both as scientists, and as early faculty members at the University, they helped to pave the way for the next generations of women faculty and students.

CRISPR scissors, Cas12a, enables cutting-edge diagnostics

February 15, 2018

CRISPR-Cas12a TestingCRISPR-Cas12a, one of the DNA-cutting proteins revolutionizing biology today, has an unexpected side effect that makes it an ideal enzyme for simple, rapid and accurate disease diagnostics.  

Super-resolution microscopy reveals fine detail of cellular mesh

January 30, 2018

Ke Xu. Photo by KaltschmidtIn the current issue of the journal Cell Reports, Ke Xu and his colleagues at UC Berkeley use the technique to provide a sharp view of the geodesic mesh that supports the outer membrane of a red blood cell, revealing why such cells are sturdy yet flexible enough to squeeze through narrow capillaries as they carry oxygen to our tissues.

National Academy of Sciences honors Raghavendra, Doudna

January 17, 2018

Jennifer DoudnaPrasad Raghavendra, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science, and Jennifer Doudna, a professor of molecular and cell biology and of chemistry, were honored this week by the National Academy of Sciences for their innovative body of research.

The future of biochemistry

January 12, 2018

ACS Biochemistry Issue CoverThe ACS January 2018 Special Biochemistry Issue has included College of Chemistry professors Ming Hammond, Evan Miller, and David Savage among the 44 early career scientists identified as representing the future of biochemistry. These scientists are noted by the publication for tackling problems of biological relevance.