CRISPR

CRISPR Cas9 explained. CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) are segments of prokaryotic DNA containing short repetitions of base sequences. is an RNA-guided gene-editing platform that makes use of a bacterially derived protein (Cas9) and a synthetic guide RNA to introduce a double strand break at a specific location within the genome.

Cas9 is an enzyme that snips DNA, and CRISPR is a collection of DNA sequences that tells Cas9 exactly where to snip.

Professor Jennifer Doudna speaks at UH Hilo about her CRISPR discovery

September 22, 2018

Jennifer Doudna gives lecture in Hilo, Hawaii.

Professor Jennifer Doudna ( seen here with (left) UH Hilo Interim Chancelor Marcia Sakai and (right) UH Hilo Chancer Emerita Rose Tseng presented the inaugural UH Hilo Rose and Raymond Tseng Distinguished Lecture. view video here

Why the gene editors of tomorrow need to study ethics today

September 19, 2018

Jennifer Doudna and Jiwoo Lee. Photo courtesy of Michelle Groskopf, Wired Magazine

Two years after biochemist Jennifer Doudna helped introduce the world to the gene-editing tool known as Crispr, a 14-year-old from New Jersey turned it loose on a petri dish full of lung cancer cells, disrupting their ability to multiply.

UC vows to protect groundbreaking CRISPR invention despite court decision

September 11, 2018

DNA photo - Getty Images

A statement about the U.S. Court of Appeals decision on the University of California's patent interference claim before the Patent Trial and Appeal Board b by Charles F. Robinson, Office of General Counsel, UC Office of the President.

Jennifer Doudna to receive the 2018 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize

September 14, 2018

Jennifer DoudnaThe Rockefeller University has announced that Jennifer Doudna will receive this year's Pearl Meister Greengard Prize, a major international accolade honoring outstanding women scientists.

Jennifer Doudna opens lab at the Gladstone Institutes

September 5, 2018

Jennifer DoudnaBiochemist Jennifer A. Doudna, PhD, is moving part of her research efforts to the Gladstone Institutes in San Francisco, where she will launch new collaborations that will help advance this breakthrough technique to solve some of humankind’s most intractable diseases.

Court denies UC appeal, allowing issue of key CRISPR patents

September 10, 2018

DNA strandThe Court of Appeals today concluded that the use of CRISPR-Cas9 in plant and animal cells is separately patentable from Drs. Doudna and Charpentier's invention of the use of CRISPR-Cas9 in any environment. We are evaluating further litigation options. We also look forward to proving that Drs. Doudna and Charpentier first invented usage in plant and animal cells – a fact that is already widely recognized by the global scientific community – as the Doudna-Charpentier team's several pending patent applications that cover use of CRISPR-Cas9 in plant and animal cells are now under examination by the patent office.

Jennifer Doudna honored at Kavli Prize ceremonies in Norway

September 4, 2018


Virginijus Šikšnys, Jennifer Doudna and Emmanuelle CharpentierCRISPR-Cas9 inventor Jennifer Doudna, a UC Berkeley professor of chemistry and of molecular and cell biology, was awarded the 2018 Kavli Prize in Nanoscience today in Norway during a gala ceremony hosted by King Harald V. She shared the prestigious honor with her colleague Emmanuelle Charpentier, now at the Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology in Berlin, Germany, and another early CRISPR researcher, Virginijus Šikšnys of Vilnius University in Lithuania.

CRISPR inventor Jennifer Doudna sees first human therapy five to 10 years away

August 24, 2018


CRISPER, Jennifer DoudnaBiochemist Jennifer Doudna, a pioneer of the Crispr gene-editing technology that’s taken Wall Street by storm says the field is probably five to 10 years away from having an approved therapy for patients.

Only at Cal: New class teaches undergrads how to ‘CRISPR’

August 21, 2018

A student pipetting in the summer course on CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing. (Kevin Doxzen photo)For three weeks in July and August, 30 undergraduates took a summer course to learn how to use the revolutionary gene-editing technology in preparation for jumping into the research lab while still students.