Nanotechnology

2021 Priestley Medalist A. Paul Alivisatos helped introduce the world to the nanocrystal

April 14, 2021

Paul Alivisatos

2021 Priestley Medalist A. Paul Alivisatos helped introduce the world to the nanocrystal. Photo Gabriela Hasbun for C&EN.

Scientists uncover a process that stands in the way of making quantum dots brighter

March 26, 2021

Atomic scale quantum dot arrays

Atomic scale quantum dot arrays. Illustration courtesy of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Bright semiconductor nanocrystals known as quantum dots give QLED TV screens their vibrant colors. But attempts to increase the intensity of that light generate heat instead, reducing the dots’ light-producing efficiency.

Nano-sized sensors learn new biological tricks

September 23, 2020

fluorophore labeled DNA

Rebecca Pinals mixes SWNTs with fluorophore-labeled DNA to create a nanosensor, then measures their optical response as they interact with biomolecules. (Photo credit: Rebecca Pinals).

Nano strategy overcomes barriers to plant genetic engineering

May 28, 2020

Markita Landry files paten for new nanotube technology

Markita Landry and UC Berkeley recently filed patents on a new nanotube technology to delete genes in crop plants without the risk of inserting new genes. Editing the genome of crop plants can boost such traits as disease resistance or drought tolerance. Since the new process adds no genes to the plant genome in the editing process, it conforms to non-GMO requirements in the U.S. and several other countries outside Europe.

Scientists Bring Polymers Into Atomic-Scale Focus

November 12, 2018

image shows a rendering (gray and pink) of the molecular structure of a peptoid polymer

From water bottles and food containers to toys and tubing, many modern materials are made of plastics. And while we produce about 110 million tons per year of synthetic polymers like polyethylene and polypropylene worldwide for these plastic products, there are still mysteries about polymers at the atomic scale. 

Freeze Frame: Scientists capture atomic-scale snapshots of artificial proteins

December 5, 2019

Nitash Balsara

Protein-like molecules called “polypeptoids” (or “peptoids,” for short) have great promise as precision building blocks for creating a variety of designer nanomaterials, like flexible nanosheets – ultrathin, atomic-scale 2D materials. They could advance a number of applications – such as synthetic, disease-specific antibodies and self-repairing membranes or tissue – at a low cost.Scientists at Berkeley Lab are the first to use cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to image atomic changes in artificial proteins known as “peptoids.” Their findings have implications for the synthesis of soft, 2D materials for a wide variety of applications.

UC Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab will one day make windows work like solar panels

January 29, 2018

Peidong YangA breakthrough by Peidong Yang could one day help tall buildings use dramatically less energy, by using their windows to generate electricity. For the full story visit ABC7 News.

Paul Alivisatos announced as 2019 Welch Award in Chemistry recipient

September 13, 2019

Paul Alivisatos and Charles Leiber

The Welch Foundation, one of the nation’s largest sources of private funding for basic chemical research, has announced that Drs. Armand Paul Alivisatos and Charles M. Lieber are the 2019 recipients of the prestigious Robert A. Welch Award in Chemistry. Highly-respected and influential leaders in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology, Drs. Alivisatos and Lieber are being recognized for their important research contributions which have had a significant, positive impact on humankind.