Nanotechnology

Long-sought carbon structure joins graphene, fullerene family

August 13, 2018

three-dimensional cage structure of a schwarziteThe discovery of buckyballs surprised and delighted chemists in the 1980s, nanotubes jazzed physicists in the 1990s, and graphene charged up materials scientists in the 2000s, but one nanoscale carbon structure – a negatively curved surface called a schwarzite – has eluded everyone. Until now.

Tying electrons down with nanoribbons

August 8, 2018

nanoribbonScientists are experimenting with narrow strips of graphene, called nanoribbons, in hopes of making cool new electronic devices, but University of California, Berkeley scientists have discovered another possible role for them: as nanoscale electron traps with potential applications in quantum computers.

Markita Landry receives 2018 Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship

February 15, 2018

Markita Landry receives Alfred P. Sloan Research FellowshipThe Alfred P. Sloan Foundation has announced that Assistant Professor of Chemistry, Markita Landry, has been awarded a 2018 Sloan Research Fellowship for her work in neuroscience.”

UC Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab will one day make windows work like solar panels

January 29, 2018

Peidong YangA breakthrough by Peidong Yang could one day help tall buildings use dramatically less energy, by using their windows to generate electricity.

Artificial leaves to produce fuel on Earth and, one day, Mars

January 24, 2018

Matt Damon, Mars movieWith the right technology, the gas station of the future will make its own fuel directly from sunlight, in the process sucking up carbon and producing oxygen. Decades into the future, the same technology could provide fuel and oxygen for the first Martians, and could even be tweaked to produce fertilizer.

World-wide science

November 16, 2017

Omar Yaghi with postdocsBased at UC Berkeley, BGSI is dedicated to developing fundamental science research in foreign countries aided by funds provided by local governments, industries, and institutions.

Tracking long-range energy flow on its native nanometer and picosecond scales

October 30, 2017

Nanoscale excitation spot graphic, Ginsberg Research.In a new study, appearing in the November 2017 issue of Nature Materials, a research team led by UC Berkeley Associate Professor of Chemistry and Physics, Naomi S. Ginsberg, has announced the development and implementation of the most direct method to-date to track the nanoscale process of energy flow that punctuates the initial picoseconds after light absorption in some natural and artificial light harvesting systems. The research results are also available online at the Nature Materials website.