COVID-19

CRISPR and the Code Breaker

March 8, 2021

Visionary biochemist Jennifer Doudna shared the Nobel Prize last year for the gene-editing technology known as CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats), which has the potential to cure diseases caused by genetic mutations. Correspondent David Pogue talks with Doudna about the promises and perils of CRISPR; and with Walter Isaacson, author of the new book "The Code Breaker," about why the biotech revolution will dwarf the digital revolution in importance.

This is the year that CRISPR moves from lab to clinic

March 8, 2021

Women makes COVID discovery in lab

Scientist makes COVID discovery in lab. (Photo Adobe Stock)

Chemistry senior's advice on surfing the pandemic

February 23, 2021

Katia Gibson

Katia Gibson, (B.S. '21, Chem) surfing last August at Jalama Beach in Santa Barbara County, brought along two surfboards, to get practice time on each. (Photo by Steve Gibson)

New test detects coronavirus in just 5 minutes

November 5, 2020

Jennifer Doudna discusses new COVID-19 test

Jennifer Doudna talks with Alex Ehrenberg, a graduate student in integrative biology who is helping organize the FAST trial of saliva tests for COVID-19. Photo: UC Berkeley/Irene Yi

Crispr, not just for gene editing

October 30, 2020

Illustration of Crispr-Cas activity

Crispr–Cas is part of an ancient bacterial immune system that detects and chops up invading viruses’ DNA. Source: © Science Photo Library

An expert on 'undruggable' targets tackles the coronavirus

October 5, 2020

Dan Nomura

Nomura in his lab at UC Berkeley. Photo: Elena Zhukova

Teresa Head-Gordon receives COVID-19 research funding

June 25, 2020

Teresa Head-Gordon

Teresa Head-Gordon, Chancellor's Professor of Chemistry, Bioengineering, and Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, joins three colleagues from Berkeley Engineering who have received funding from the C3.ai Digital Transformation Institute for COVID-19 projects.

UC Berkeley launches trial of saliva test for COVID-19

June 30, 2020

COVID-19 saliva based test

Scientists from the Innovative Genomics Institute (IGI), the same UC Berkeley group that rapidly popped up a state-of-the-art COVID-19 testing laboratory in March, are now trialing a quicker way to obtain patient samples: through saliva. Saliva, collected in the same way companies like 23andMe and Ancestry.com get samples for DNA genealogy analysis, can be gathered without medical supervision, and that saves time, money and precious PPE.